Best Rimfire Rifle Scopes for the .22LR: Leupold, Nikon and Other Optics Reviews

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Most rimfire rifle scopes can be used interchangeably for hunting large and small game.  The .22LR is the most popular rimfire cartridge and the .17 HMR is right behind it.  For the purpose of today’s breakdown, we specifically focus on the .22LR due to the sheer popularity of the caliber.  Most of the scopes in our list will be flexible enough for any other rimfire cartridge you plan to shoot.

Due to its relatively inexpensive ammunition and low recoil, the .22LR cartridge is quite likely the single most popular rifle cartridge in the world. In fact, many shooters seem to have gotten their start shooting a .22 rifle since it is the perfect choice for backyard target practice as well as for hunting small game like squirrels and rabbits.

If you are the type of person that knows your way around a scope, below you will find 10 of our favorite rimfire scopes so you can skip the read.  For additional detail, continue on and you can jump into rifle scope 101 along with some important points of what you should look for before making any scope purchase.

The Top 10 Rimfire Rifle Scopes

SCOPE:MAGNIFICATION:RANGE:WEIGHT:BUDGET:
Nikon Prostaff3-9x40Medium-Long13.6 oz.$$
Leuopold VX-1 Rimfire2-7x28mmShort-Medium8.2 oz.$$$
Nikon P-Rimfire2-7x32mmShort-Medium16.1 oz.$$
Bushnell AR Optics 22 BDC2-7x32mmShort-Medium19.6 oz.$$
Vortex Optics Crossfire II2-7x32mmShort-Medium14.3 oz.$$
Barska Plinker 223-9x32mmMedium19.4 oz.$
Simmons .22 Mag3-9x32mmMedium10 oz.$
Tasco Rimfire Series3-9x32mmMedium11.3 oz.$
BSA Sweet .223-9x40mmMedium-Long19.4 oz.$
Nikon Prostaff BDC4-12x40mmMedium-Long13.6 oz.$$$

Now that you’ve seen our top 10 choices for a rimfire rifle, let’s dive a little deeper and take a look at our buyer’s guide as well as giving you a run down on scope 101 so you understand basic terminology.

Rifle Scope Buyer’s Guide

We’ve broken down our Buyer’s guide into two parts.  Scope 101 and rifle scope anatomy.  We feel that it’s important for you to not only understand scope basics, but also what each piece of the scope does.  This way you understand exactly what you should address before adding an optic to your rimfire rifle.

1. Rifle Scope 101

Rifle Scope 101 for Rimfire Rifles

Most .22 rimfire rifles are relatively inexpensive to purchase making them the perfect youth rifle for young shooters to learn with.  They are also a tremendous amount of fun for adults to shoot. While a person can certainly get by without mounting a scope on their .22 rifle, not doing so limits you to shooting at relatively close ranges and it also prevents you from experiencing the amazing pinpoint accuracy that this little cartridge is capable of.  Rimfire scopes traditionally operate best in the medium to long distance range, typically making them different to outfit than the optics you would choose for an AR-15 or other centerfire cartridge.

Below we’ve outlined several important items below that you should take into consideration when looking to outfit your rimfire rifle with the appropriate optics choice.

Power: The first step to choosing a scope for your .22 rimfire rifle is to understand all the different parts of a scope, what their function is, and how they affect the scope’s performance.  Some rifle scopes feature fixed power magnification while others feature variable power magnification and each has its advantages and disadvantages.

Some hunters have a distinct preference for fixed power rifle scopes because they have far fewer internal lenses as well as far fewer moving parts and thus, they are less subject to being knocked off zero.  Some shooters prefer variable power rifle scopes because they make it easier to achieve the level of accuracy they require and different ranges.

Light Conditions: Another thing to consider is the light condition you plan to hunt in.  When hunting in low light conditions, a large objective lens does a far better job of collecting light and provides a more clear sight picture.  Scopes with large objective lenses also require significantly taller rings and which also raises the position of the ocular lens.  This forces the shooter to place their cheek higher on the stock.

It should be noted that for any given diameter Objective Lens, when you increase the magnification of a rifle scope, you also decrease the size of the Exit Pupil.  This means a rifle scope with a larger Objective Lens will provide a brighter sight picture at higher magnifications because it has a larger Exit Pupil. In addition,

Lens Coatings: Lens coatings are also important.  Coatings affect both the amount of light transmitted through the scope tube as well as the clarity of the sight picture. In fact, the more coatings the objective and ocular lenses have, the greater the clarity of the sight picture will be due to both glare reduction and light gathering ability.

Turrets:  Turret adjustments are also something you should consider before buying a scope.  Although low profile turrets are standard on most .22 LR specific rifle scopes, some scopes do feature high profile, target style, turrets that make it easy for the shooter to adjust the point of impact for different ranges and then quickly and easily return to the original zero point.

Waterproof/Fogproof:  You should also be looking for a scope that will withstand the elements.  Making sure your scope is designed to be both waterproof and fogproof should be at the top of your list.  While most .22LR specific scopes feature tubes that have been purged and then filled with nitrogen, scopes filled with Argon/Krypton gas mixture are a better choice because the Argon and Krypton atoms are significantly larger than the Nitrogen atom.  This makes them less likely to migrate from the hypertonic atmosphere inside of the scope tube to the hypotonic atmosphere outside of the scope tube.

2. Rifle Scope Anatomy

Rifle Scope Anatomy for Rimfire

So, now that you understand what to look for when purchasing a rifle scope for your .22 rimfire rifle, a more in depth explanation of a rifle scope’s anatomy will be helpful in enabling you to better understand what each term means and how it affects the performance of the scope.

Scope Tube:  The Scope Tube is the metal tube that contains both the Ocular and Objective lenses as well as the Reticle and consists of the Objective Bell and the Eye Bell which contain the Objective Lens and the Ocular Lens respectively.

Eye Bell:  The Eye Bell is the flared part of the scope tube located closest to the shooter’s eye and contains the Ocular Lens.

Eye Piece:  The Eye Piece is located on the end of the scope closest to the shooter’s eye and consists of the Eye Bell and the Ocular Lens and, it is designed to move in or out in order to focus the Sight Picture seen through the scope.

Ocular Lens:  The Ocular Lens (contained within the Eye Piece) is the lens located closest to the shooter’s eye when looking through the scope tube and is used to focus the image created by the Objective Lens by moving the Eye Piece in or out to change the focal plane. Ocular Lenses are measure in millimeters and the larger the Ocular Lens is, the larger the scope’s field of view will be.

Objective Bell:  The Objective Bell is the part of the scope tube located farthest from the shooter’s eye and contains the Objective Lens.

Objective Lens:  The Objective Lens is the lens located farthest from the shooter’s eye when looking though the scope tube and its purpose is to gather light to create the Sight Picture within the scope. Like the Ocular Lens, the diameter of the Objective Lens is measured in millimeters.  The larger the diameter of the Objective Lens is, the more ambient light it is able to collect and transmit through the Scope Tube to the Ocular Lens.

The larger the Objective Lens is, the brighter the Sight Picture will be; especially in low light conditions.  Rifle scopes with larger Objective Lenses do require taller scope mounts to allow for the increased diameter of the Objective Bell.

Exit Pupil:  The Exit Pupil is a virtual aperture within the scope tube through which all light entering the Objective Lens must pass in order to reach the Ocular Lens and is measure in millimeters. The larger the Objective Lens is, the larger the Exit Pupil will be and the brighter the Sight Picture will be at any given ambient light level. To determine the size of the Exit Pupil, divide the diameter of the Objective Lens by the level of magnification (ex. a 4 x 32mm scope has an exit pupil of 8mm).

Focal Plane:  All variable power rifle scopes focus on either the first or second focal plane. The definition of the term “focal plane” is: the plane that is perpendicular to the plane of a lens and passes through a focal point.

Rifle Scope Focal PlaneA better explanation of focal plane is that when referring to variable power rifle scopes, the first focal plane increases or decreases with the power setting so that the reticle appears the same size when viewing a target.

The second focal plane remains the same size as the image increases or decreases in size with the power setting.  This causes the reticle also increases or decreases in size when the magnification power is changed. This means the reticle covers more area when a low power setting is used and less when a high power setting is used.

Second focal plane rifle scopes are both smaller and lighter than first focal plane rifle scopes but, the point of impact can also change when changing magnification levels. European hunters tend to prefer rifle scopes that focus on the first focal plane while American hunters tend to prefer rifle scopes that focus on the second focal plane.

Lens Coatings:  According to a law of physics called Snell’s Law, any time light strikes a glass lens at an angle of less than 48.5 degrees, that light is reflected and it does not pass through the Objective Lens. Any light that strikes a glass lens at an angle greater than 48.5 degrees does pass through the lens and the scope tube, creating a sight picture within the scope tube.

Coating rifle scope lenses both reduces the amount of glare and the amount of light lost to reflection. Different types of lens coatings affect the amount of reflection as well as the clarity of the sight picture. Two popular lens coatings are Magnesium Fluoride and the mineral Corundum (aka Ruby). Thus, when viewing rifle scopes on a manufacturer’s web site, you will commonly see four different designations consisting of:

  • Coated: A single layer on at least one lens surface.
  • Fully Coated: A single layer on all air to glass surfaces.
  • Multicoated: Multiple layers on at least one lens surface.
  • Fully Multicoated: Multiple layers on all air to glass surfaces.

Field of View:  A rifle scope’s field of view is the number of feet or yards measured horizontally that a shooter sees at a distance of 100 yards when he looks through the scope’s Ocular Lens. A wide field-of-view is desirable in a rifle scope because it makes it easier to acquire your target and track it if it moves. However, as a general rule of thumb, the higher the magnification, the more narrower the field-of-view becomes.

Magnification Range:  As mentioned above, rifle scopes are available with either a fixed or variable level of magnification. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages. For instance, fixed-power scopes have no moving parts other than the reticles and they require fewer internal lenses making them both lighter and more rugged than variable-power scopes.

Variable-power rifle scopes enable the shooter to quickly change the magnification of their scope for shooting at short, medium, or long range ranges. For hunting dangerous game in heavy cover, you might choose a fixed 1.5 power scope or a variable 1×4 power scope so that you can acquire the target quickly. For hunting at medium to long ranges, a fixed 4 power scope or a variable 3×9 power scope would be a better choice, and typically is for a rifle like the .22LR.

Reticles:  Rifle scope reticles are available in several different types. However, the most popular type of reticle for hunting is the Fine, Medium, or Heavy “Crosshair”.  While fine crosshairs are a good choice for long range shots or for hunting small game, medium crosshairs are a good choice for large game at medium ranges.  Large crosshairs are best suited for hunting large game at close ranges and/or in thick foliage where acquiring the target quickly is of paramount importance.

Rifle Scope ReticleAnother popular type of reticle for close range hunting is the Duplex Reticle which consists of wide bars extending from the edges of the lens that transition to narrow bars in the center of the lens.  This enables the shooter to quickly acquire a sight picture in a tense shooting situation but still have a fine point of aim.

A third type of reticle that is popular for hunting at close ranges is the Target Dot reticle which consists of a set of medium crosshairs and a medium sized dot in the center of the crosshairs which, once again, allows the shooter to pick up the point of aim very quickly in a tense shooting situation.

Lastly, a type of reticle that is popular with long range shooters is the Modern Range Finding Reticle which enables the shooter to accurately gauge the distance to the target and compensate accordingly.

Parallax:  Parallax is an optical condition that occurs when the image of the target is not focused precisely on the Reticle Plane (located at the turrets near the center of the scope tube).  It is visible as an apparent movement between the reticle and the target or, in extreme cases, as an out-of-focus image, when the shooter moves their head.

By rotating the Parallax Adjustment Ring on the Objective Bell to the hash mark that matches the range of the target, the Objective Lens becomes properly focused on the Reticle Plane to provide a clear sight picture. This means that scopes with a parallax adjustment provide a more clear sight picture when shooting a varying ranges.

Turrets:  The turrets on a rifle scope serve the purpose of enabling the shooter to move both the vertical and horizontal reticles up or down and right or left separately in order to adjust the bullet’s point of impact on the target. Rifle scopes have one of two different types of turrets depending on their purpose.

Hunting scopes generally have low profile turrets that are designed to be adjusted with a coin whereas tactical/target rifle scopes generally have high profile turrets that are easily adjusted with the shooter’s fingers. In addition, as a general rule, each “click” on either type of turret equals ¼” of adjustment left/right or up/down at 100 yards. This type of adjustment is called a 1/4 Minute of Angle adjustment because one M.O.A. equals one inch at 100 yards.

Eye Relief: The amount of Eye Relief a rifle scope has is important to the shooter because some shooters like to place their eye as close to the Ocular Lens as possible in order to block out ambient light while others prefer to have it placed farther away from their eye due to the fact that heavy-recoiling rifles can cause the Eyepiece to impact the shooter’s eye socket. It is important to choose a rifle scope with an eye relief that is appropriate for both the shooter and the caliber of the rifle.

Waterproof and Fogproof:  Due to the fact that early rifle scope tubes were not purged of air and then sealed (called negative pressure), they were subject to the variances of the ambient air pressure and humidity. this made lenses fog up whenever the air became moist and they could even collect water inside of the scope tube if the rifle were accidently dropped while crossing a stream or wading in a swamp.

Rifle scope manufacturers have invented a process that enables them to first evacuate all of the air from a scope tube and then replace it with either Nitrogen or an Argon/Krypton gas mixture (both of which are inert).  They then seal the scope tube to maintain the positive internal pressure so that moist air cannot enter the scope tube and thus fog the lenses.

Ten of our Favorite Rimfire Rifle Scopes

Now that you’ve gotten a breakdown of what you should be taking into consideration and a little bit of Rifle scope 101, let’s take a look at our 10 favorite rimfire scopes on today’s market.  All of the scopes below should work for any type of rimfire rifle depending on your budget and planned use of your rifle.

Below we’ve ordered our favorites according to the typical distance they are used in with the exception of our top choice.  The Nikon Prostaff is our top choice for many reasons, continue on below to find out why.


Nikon Prostaff1. Nikon Prostaff 3-9×40 Rifle Scope

Power & Objective: 3-9×40
Field of View: 33.8 ft. to 11.3 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3.6 inch
Weight: 13.7 oz.
What we like: Ease of use, versatility, cost
What we don’t: Manufactured overseas

The Nikon Prostaff is the top rated scope on our board for a few reasons.  First and foremost it’s a great all around scope that you can use in virtually any situation.  The variable power will predominantly be used in the medium-long distance range, making this an excellent distance scope for those that are on a budget.  This scope sits in between the quality matrix of your cheap scopes and your top end optics choices – right in the middle.  The best part about it is that it will equally mount to other rifles, including AR-15s or other tactical variants with relative ease.

The field of view is clear at all magnifications and the BDC reticle is easy to view no matter the distance.  It’s notoriously easy to zero in, making it a fantastic choice for beginners that don’t have a lot of time logged at the range.  If you are someone that’s just starting out or on a tight budget, you can’t get a better scope for under $200.00.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


VX-1 Rimfire Scope2. Leupold VX-1 Rimfire 2-7x28mm

Power & Objective: 2–7x28mm
Field of View: 46.2 ft. to 17.8 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 2X – 3.8”/7X – 3”
Weight: 8.2 oz.
What we like: Leupold quality, ease of use
What we don’t: Cost

The VX-1 series is Leupold’s entry level series of rifle scopes specifically designed for hunters who are looking for a relatively inexpensive yet, high quality, rifle scope. Featuring a 100 percent waterproof construction with a standard 1 inch tube and a 28mm objective bell for easy, low profile mounting.

It also includes Leupold’s high brightness, multi-coat, lens system and a fine duplex reticle to make it easy to achieve pinpoint accuracy on small game species. In addition, it also features a micro-friction windage and elevation dials marked in 1/4″ MOA increments with a 60 yard parallax correction, a generous eye relief range, and an incredibly rugged construction equal to their Gold Ring series.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Nikon P Rimfire3. Nikon P-Rimfire 2-7x32mm

Power & Objective: 2-7x32mm
Field of View: 22.3 ft. to 6.4 ft. @ 50 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3.8”
Weight: 16.1 oz.
What we like: Ease of use, specifically designed for rimfire use
What we don’t: Manufactured overseas

Widely considered to be one of the top rifle scope manufacturers in the business, the Nikon P-Rimfire series scopes are specifically designed for use with the .22 LR cartridge. Featuring a 100 percent waterproof and fogproof construction with a nitrogen filled 1 inch diameter tube, this scope also features a 2x to 7x magnification range and a fully multi-coated lens system for maximum light transmission with a 32mm objective lens for a good compromise between low profile and light gathering ability.

Also, it features Nikon’s Ballistic Drop Compensation 150 reticle which provides shooters with unique, open circle, aiming points from 50 t0 150 yards with a 50 yard parallax setting. Also, it features tactical style turrets with 1/4 inch click adjustments at 50 yards and a Zero-Reset Turret feature than enables shooters to sight-in as usual and then easily reset the scope to zero after making field adjustments.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Bushnell AR 22 BDC Rimfire4. Bushnell AR Optics 22 BDC Rimfire 2-7X32MM

Power & Objective: 2–7x32mm
Field of View: 50 ft. to 17 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3.7”
Weight: 19.6 oz.
What we like: Bushnell brand, cost, designed for AR-15 style .22 LR rifles
What we don’t: Weight

A little less expensive than the Leupold and Nikon scopes listed above, the Bushnell AR Optics series scopes are specifically designed for use with AR-15 style rifles chambered for the .22 LR cartridge. Thus, they feature a long, 3.7 inch, eye relief combined with a 2x to 7x magnification range and a 32mm objective lens with a fully multi-coated lens system.

In addition, they also feature Bushnell’s Drop Zone .22LR specific reticle and an extra wide field of view to make it easy to pick up moving targets. Plus, it also features three, target style, turrets with 1/4 inch MOA at 100 yard adjustments.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Vortex Crossfire II5. Vortex Crossfire II 2-7x32mm

Power & Objective: 2–7x32mm
Field of View: 42 ft. to 12.6 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3 1/2”
Weight: 14.3 oz.
What we like: Vortex Brand, cost
What we don’t: Not specifically designed for rimfire cartridge

The Vortex Crossfire II Series scope is another mid-range rifle scope but, unlike most of the other rifle scopes listed here, it is not specifically designed for use with the .22LR cartridge. However, even so, it still makes an excellent choice for that particular purpose! Featuring a 2x to 7x magnification range with a 32mm objective bell with fully multi-coated, machine locked, lenses, this scope provides a clear, bright, sight picture.

Also, it features a single-piece, 1 inch, purged and nitrogen filled tube that is not only waterproof and fogproof, it is also shockproof. In addition, it features standard, low profile, adjustable windage and elevation turrets with a fast reset zero function and the fast focus eye piece makes easy to adjust the focus for varying ranges.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Barska Plinker 22 Rimfire6. BARSKA Plinker 22 3-9x32mm

Power & Objective: 3–9x32mm
Field of View: 36 ft. to 13 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3 1/2”
Weight: 19.4 oz.
What we like: Cost, decent track record
What we don’t: You get what you pay for, manufactured overseas

Like the BSA scope listed above, the BARSKA Plinker-22 series rifle scope falls somewhere in between the Leupold and Nikon scopes listed above and the Simmons and Tasco scopes listed below. Featuring fully coated optics with a 30/30 reticle that is parallax free at 50 yards and standard, low profile, windage and elevation turrets with 1/4 inch MOA click adjustments, this scope is specifically designed for hunting and plinking with a .22LR cartridge.

In addition, it also features a standard 1 inch tube that has been purged and sealed to be 100 percent waterproof and fogproof and, it includes two, 3/8 inch, rings and two lens covers.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Simmons .22 Mag7. Simmons .22 Mag 3-9x32mm

Power & Objective: 3–9x32mm
Field of View: 31.4 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3 1/2”
Weight: 10 oz.
What we like: Cost, designed to use with .22 LR and .22 Mag
What we don’t: Same as the Barska – you get what you pay for, manufactured overseas

An entry level .22 LR rifle scope for hunters on a budget, the Simmons .22 Mag series rifle scopes are hard to beat for the price. Featuring a 3x to 9x magnification range with a 32mm objective lens and fully coated optics with a waterproof and fogproof, 1 inch diameter tube and accompanying rings and a total weigh of only 10 ounces, this is excellent scope for lightweight rifles chambered for the .22 LR cartridge.

Also featuring a Quick Acquisition eye piece and a generous eye relief with a relatively wide field of view and Simmons Truplex reticle, this scope is available with a matte black finish to match blued steel rifles.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Tasco 22 Rifle Scope8. Tasco .22 Rifle Scope 3-9x32mm with 30/30 Reticle

Magnification: 3-9x32mm
Field of View: 17.5 ft. to 6 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3”
Weight: 11.3 oz.
What we like: Cost, ease of use
What we don’t: Still getting what you pay for, manufactured overseas

Similar to the Simmons scopes listed above, the Tasco .22 Riflescope is specifically designed to be an inexpensive, lightweight, .22 LR specific, rifle scope for hunters on a budget. Featuring a 3x to 9x magnification range with a 32mm objective lens and fully coated lenses with Tasco’s 30/30 reticle and a 50 yard parallax setting and 1/4 inch MOA click adjustment, this scope is an excellent choice for hunting small game species.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


BSA Sweet .22 Rimfire9. BSA Sweet 22 Series 3-9x40mm

Power & Objective: 3-9x40mm
Field of View: 40 ft. to 13 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3”
Weight: 20 oz.
What we like: Cost, good track record
What we don’t: Still getting what you pay for, manufactured overseas

Although perhaps not as well known as Leupold and Nikon, BSA is also a manufacturer of high quality sporting optics and their Sweet 22 series is no exception. However, unlike most scope manufactures who incorporate ballistic drop compensation reticles calibrated for a specific cartridge, the BAS Sweet 22 series instead uses adjustable, target style, windage and elevation turrets with interchangeable drums specifically calibrated for 36 grain, 38 grain, and 40 grain .22 caliber bullets fired from the .22 LR cartridge.

In addition, it also features a 3x to 9x magnification range with a 40mm objective lens and a parallax adjustable objective bell. Plus, it features a standard 1 inch, waterproof, fogproof, tube with multiple internal lenses.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Nikon Prostaff Rimfire II10. Nikon ProStaff Rimfire 4-12x40mm

Power & Objective: 4-12x40mm
Field of View: 23.6 ft. to 7.9 ft. @ 100 yds.
Tube Diameter: 1 inch
Eye Relief: 3.7”
Weight: 13.6 oz.
What we like: Nikon quality, great for distance shooting
What we don’t: Manufactured overseas

Another fine rifle scope specifically designed for the .22 LR cartridge, the Nikon Prostaff Rimfire features a 4x to 12x magnification range with an extra large 40mm, fully mulit-coated, lenses for a superior sight picture even in low light conditions. Also, it features Nikon’s Spot On Ballistic Match Technology, which provides users with exact aiming points on the BDC reticle for any load or ammunition at a specified range.

In addition, sighting in is easy with a ¼ inch MOA adjustment at 50 yards and a 75 yard parallax setting with Spring-Loaded Instant Zero-Reset turrets that allow you to reset your turrets to zero after sighting in to make adjustments in the field easy. Plus, it’s 100 percent waterproof, fogproof, shockproof and, it’s backed by Nikon’s Limited Lifetime Warranty.

CLICK HERE FOR PRICING & USER REVIEWS ON AMAZON.COM!


Parting Shots on the Best Scopes for a Rimfire Rifle:

Now you should have a better understanding of what to look for when purchasing a rifle scope for your .22 rimfire rifle as well as an explanation of what all of those obscure terms scope manufactures use to designate the various parts of a rifle scope.  You should also have a basic understanding of how each part affects the performance of the scope and this should help you understand why there is such a wide range of price points.

It’s important to keep in mind the old adage “You get what you pay for” since it is especially true when purchasing a rifle scope. While price is not always a true gauge of a particular rifle scope’s quality, the simple fact is that it does cost the manufacturer significantly more to produce a high quality rifle scope than it does one of lesser quality.

Due to the necessity of including numerous internal lenses when building a variable power scope, fixed power rifle scopes are significantly cheaper for the manufacturer to make than variable power scopes. While the ability to quickly and easily zoom in or out when viewing a target is certainly a nice feature, to have, constructing such a rifle scope does require more moving parts making variable power rifle scopes more prone to failure than fixed power scopes.

However, having said that, it is also important to note that any modern, well made, rifle scope is specifically designed to be durable. Failures are typically few and far between. In fact, most rifle scope failures are caused by accidently dropping the rifle onto a hard surface which can dent the scope tube and or crack one of the lenses.

Purchasing the best rifle scope for your .22 rimfire rifle is really a matter of deciding which features are most important to you and then choosing one within your price range that has the features that best suit your needs.

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